Biblical Studies Carnival

Phil Long has posted the Biblical Studies Carnival round-up for September. These carnivals – a long-standing blog tradition – are always a good way to discover new blogs or posts you may have missed, and Phil’s is no exception.

But let this also serve as notice that I shall be hosting the October carnival on this blog, which will be posted on 1 November. (I last did one a long time ago, on a blog far, far away, scattered many moons since on the winds of cyberspace.)

If you have posts to which you wish to draw my attention for that round-up, then leave a link in the comments here.

Living comfortably: the fiction of a stipend?

Living Ministry Research Project logo

This week’s Church Times reported “Clergy living comfortably“. However, my eye was caught by the paragraph that suggested all was not quite as well as the headline suggested.

Overall, about three-quarters of respondents indicated that, financially, they were “living comfortably’ or “doing all right’. Eighty-two per cent of ordained respondents were able to draw on other sources of income than that received for ministry. Those unable to do so were “much more likely to struggle financially’, with several reporting dependency on tax credits and benefits.

It took a while to track down the report, which appeared to be referenced neither in the CT report, nor on the C of E website in any obvious place. It turns out the project is on one of the many proliferating branded sites. Continue reading “Living comfortably: the fiction of a stipend?”

Ten: a photographic selection

I’ve taken advantage of a few days’ leave to tackle one of those tasks I’ve never really found the energy to get round to: cataloguing, winnowing, and keywording my photos. Here are ten of those I was pleased (for one reason or another) to reacquaint myself with.

Clubbing together in Corinth (a review)

Detail of Roman banquet

It’s always interesting to read a book which works hard to overturn a consensus. I’ve just finished a scholarly monograph which attempts to do just that: The Pauline Church and the Corinthian Ekklēsia by Richard Last.

Last’s aim is to set the Corinthian church in the context of Greco-Roman associations. He thinks previous scholarship has overestimated both the size and the distinctiveness of the Corinthian church. As he makes his case he pays particular attention to questions of membership dues, elections of officers, and honorific awards. Continue reading “Clubbing together in Corinth (a review)”

Worcestershire Multifaith picnic

I make no great claims for my ability with video, but since yesterday I was filling in, in the absence of professional colleagues, I thought I’d use the opportunity of a very enjoyable afternoon to start learning some new skills.

The event was Holland House’s Interfaith Picnic (co-organised with Worcestershire Interfaith Forum) which included a fantastic vegan buffet meaning everyone could share the same food. The skills I was trying out for the first time were editing in Final Cut Pro X, and recording sound (for the interviews) separately on a Zoom (with a cheap lapel mike) and synchronising it in post.

This is what I made of it:

2017 Worcestershire Interfaith Picnic on Vimeo.

Geeky academic tech advice needed

Here’s hoping one or two of you blog readers, Twitter followers or Facebook friends might help out with this.

I’m coming up to that new computer purchase time again, and I’m facing that Mac or Windows question once more. Purchase price aside (for the sake of argument), what is the best choice for someone considering whether to start a fairly big academic writing project? Continue reading “Geeky academic tech advice needed”

On Dover’s Hill

Yesterday, thanks to some friends, I discovered Dover’s Hill. Far from the long, withdrawing, melancholy roar of Dover Beach, walking on Dover’s Hill was full of the more energising sights of spring. Here are a few:

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